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Archive for the ‘Park Details’ Category

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Aug 22, 2016

Posted at August 23rd, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water is on or off (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water OFF
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water ON
  • Manzanita / Pumphouse Rest Area: water ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water ON
  • Bright Angel Campground: water ON
  • Plateau Point: water <strong ON
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water OFF
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

Sand Hollow State Park

Posted at August 17th, 2016
Posted by olwm
Categories: Park Details, Uncategorized
No Comments »

With all the kids back in school and summer coming to its end, but temperatures still blazing hot, now is the perfect time to really enjoy Sand Hollow State Park. There will be less crowds and most, if not all the out of town vacationers will be gone or leaving soon. Meaning more lake for you and your loved ones!

Sand Hollow State Park in Moonlight
Photo Credit: twoGiraffer on flickr

Sand Hollow is such a fun and exciting place to visit. There are more than just water activities to enjoy as well! Sand Hollow State Park covers a staggering 20,000 acres where hills, sad dunes, the lake and more are located within. Making Sand hollow one of the more “extreme” sports parks to visit, and also one of the most visited destinations in Utah’s State Park system. Here are some of the reasons why Sand Hollow keeps people coming back:

Dunes

Sand Hollow State Park has some of the most fun Sand dunes withe designated OHV areas to ride on. See motorcycles, four-wheelers, Dune buggies and more jump, spin out and dart down hills. This is an adrenaline junkies DREAM! Not only are they extremely fun to play around on, but the sites from atop Sand Mountain are pretty amazing as well. Full 360 panoramic views that show off St. George, Hurricane, Snow Canyon State Park, Red Cliffs and more! Quite the site to see!

Lake

Sand Hollow is a 1,322 acre reservoir that provides opportunities for all kinds of water sports. There is a beach side, cliff side and even an island where you can swim to and go cliff jumping. There are places at the lake or nearby as well where you can rent all kinds of toys like paddle boards, wake boards, floats, and so much more! This is the lake for all that seek adventure and extreme fun!

Camping

There are group sites, RV hook-ups and tent sites where you can camp at within the park. Have access to the lake and hiking trails and more when you camp at Sand Hollow!

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Aug 15, 2016

Posted at August 15th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water is on or off (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water OFF
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water ON
  • Manzanita / Pumphouse Rest Area: water ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water ON
  • Bright Angel Campground: water ON
  • Plateau Point: water <strong ON
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

The Zion-Mount Carmel Highway Reopens in Zion National Park

Posted at August 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

Traffic through the park flowing once again following large rock fall https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/zmcopens.htm

Fuller Fire Trail Closures – date posted Aug 11, 2016

Posted at August 11th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

The lightning-caused Fuller Fire is located on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, north of Fuller Canyon Road, about three miles west/southwest of Point Imperial. The North Rim Developed Area remains open.

Trail and road closures due to the Fuller Fire, including maps and photos, can be found on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4845/

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Aug 11, 2016

Posted at August 11th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water is on or off (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water OFF
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water OFF due to a pipeline break
  • Manzanita / Pumphouse Rest Area: water OFF due to a pipeline break
  • Cottonwood Campground: water OFF due to a pipeline break
  • Bright Angel Campground: water OFF due to a pipeline break
  • Plateau Point: water OFF due to a pipeline break
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

Zion- Mount Carmel Highway Temporarily Closed Due to Major Rock Fall

Posted at August 11th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Severe thunderstorm also caused flash flooding at Zion National Park https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/zmcrockfall.htm

Tour of Utah Riding Through Zion National Park

Posted at July 27th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

Traffic Delays Expected August 1, 2016 https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/tourutah.htm

Fuller Fire Trail Closures – date posted Jul 25, 2016

Posted at July 25th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

The lightning-caused Fuller Fire is located on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, north of Fuller Canyon Road, about three miles west/southwest of Point Imperial. The North Rim Developed Area remains open.

Current Trail Closures:

  • Arizona Trail is closed from Lindberg Hill, north to the park boundary
  • Ken Patrick Trail
  • Point Imperial Trail
  • Nankoweap Trail
  • Saddle Mountain Trail
  • South Canyon Trail

Current Road Closures:

  • FS 610 Road
  • FS 611 Road

More information about the fire, including maps and photos, can be found on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4845/

Pine Creek Falls – Hidden Gems Of Zion

Posted at July 19th, 2016
Posted by olwm
Categories: Hikes in Zion Canyon, Park Details
No Comments »

Looking to escape the congested tourist crowds in Zion? Pine Creek offers that escape. The Pine Creek Waterfall hike is a short but beautiful and fun hike to take your family on, and will help you escape the large crowds and tourists.

The thing with Zion, is that everyone always wants to explore what has been explored over and over, and rarely take opportunities to step outside the “norm”. There is so much more beyond the more commonly known hikes like Angels Landing, Emerald pools, etc. Although those are all amazing hikes to try, they can be over-crowded and congested, due to how popular they are.

Pine Creek Waterfall
Photo Credit: Ryan Niccum on flickr

This is a hidden gem that not many know of, and is perfect for cooling off and enjoying the short .25 mile hike to the fall. Prepare to remove your shoes and walk through water, boulder climb and maybe even swim, which is quite rare in Zion National Park. This is one of the better hikes for kids and families as it is short but offers plenty of obstacles to scale as well.

This trail is easily accessed unlike others in the surrounding area making its appeal that much more! To get to the trailhead, go through the Mt. Carmel Tunnel, travel the steep switchbacks, until the road evens out, there will be a small turnout where you can park, if you see the junction, you have gone too far. On this trail be ready to see views of East Temple, West Temple, The Great Arch, Mount Spry and more!

The great thing about Zion is there will always be something new to try, and something for everyone! Don’t be afraid to venture on passed the usual and more treaded parts of the park! Zion, no matter where you choose to hike, never ceases to amaze it’s visitors.