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Pine Creek Falls – Hidden Gems Of Zion

Posted at July 19th, 2016
Posted by olwm
Categories: Hikes in Zion Canyon, Park Details
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Looking to escape the congested tourist crowds in Zion? Pine Creek offers that escape. The Pine Creek Waterfall hike is a short but beautiful and fun hike to take your family on, and will help you escape the large crowds and tourists.

The thing with Zion, is that everyone always wants to explore what has been explored over and over, and rarely take opportunities to step outside the “norm”. There is so much more beyond the more commonly known hikes like Angels Landing, Emerald pools, etc. Although those are all amazing hikes to try, they can be over-crowded and congested, due to how popular they are.

Pine Creek Waterfall
Photo Credit: Ryan Niccum on flickr

This is a hidden gem that not many know of, and is perfect for cooling off and enjoying the short .25 mile hike to the fall. Prepare to remove your shoes and walk through water, boulder climb and maybe even swim, which is quite rare in Zion National Park. This is one of the better hikes for kids and families as it is short but offers plenty of obstacles to scale as well.

This trail is easily accessed unlike others in the surrounding area making its appeal that much more! To get to the trailhead, go through the Mt. Carmel Tunnel, travel the steep switchbacks, until the road evens out, there will be a small turnout where you can park, if you see the junction, you have gone too far. On this trail be ready to see views of East Temple, West Temple, The Great Arch, Mount Spry and more!

The great thing about Zion is there will always be something new to try, and something for everyone! Don’t be afraid to venture on passed the usual and more treaded parts of the park! Zion, no matter where you choose to hike, never ceases to amaze it’s visitors.

Fuller Fire Trail Closures – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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The lightning-caused Fuller Fire is located on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, north of Fuller Canyon Road, about three miles west/southwest of Point Imperial. The Fuller Fire is currently estimated to be approximately 3,057 acres. The North Rim Developed Area remains open.

Current Trail Closures:

  • Arizona Trail is closed from Lindberg Hill, north to the park boundary
  • Ken Patrick Trail
  • Point Imperial Trail
  • Nankoweap Trail
  • Saddle Mountain Trail
  • South Canyon Trail

Current Road Closures:

  • Point Imperial Road
  • Cape Royal Road
  • FS 610 Road
  • FS 611 Road

More information about the fire, including maps and photos, can be found on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4845/

Report from the North Rim – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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The lightning-caused Fuller Fire is located on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park, north of Fuller Canyon Road, about three miles west/southwest of Point Imperial. The Fuller Fire is currently estimated to be approximately 3,057 acres. The North Rim Developed Area remains open. Some roads and trails on the North Rim are closed due to the Fuller Fire. See the “Fuller Fire Trail Closures” update.

Grand Canyon National Park’s North Rim is open for the 2016 season.

The last day for most concessioner services and regularly scheduled ranger-led programs will be October 15, 2016. The National Park Service will continue its operations including the visitor center, bookstore, and Backcountry Information Office through October 31.November 1 through December 1the North Rim will be open for day use only (no overnight parking) unless snow closes Highway 67 prior to that date. From November 1 through December 1pay-at-the-pump gas and diesel will still be available and visitors will continue to have access to Point Imperial and Bright Angel viewpoints, as well as the North Kaibab Trailhead.

After October 31, camping will be available to those that walk or hike in (no car camping) at the North Rim Campground and yurt, provided a backcountry use permit has been obtained – these permits will continue to be available through the South Rim Backcountry Information Center and at the visitor Center at Pipe Spring National Monument located in Fredonia, Arizona.

Be Aware of Lightning Danger – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Summer storms in the southwest are often accompanied by potentially deadly lightning. Visitors walking and hiking in the park are reminded that if they can hear thunder, they should consider ending outdoor activities. If the sound of thunder follows a lightning flash within 30 seconds, seek shelter inside a building or vehicle. If this is not possible, move well away from high points such as ridges and the edge of the canyon. Do not seek shelter beneath tall trees.

For more on how to be “lightning smart” read the Lightning Danger Site Bulletin.

It’s Dangerously Hot Inside the Canyon! HIKE SMART! – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Anyone who plans to hike into the canyon should take extra precautions to hike smart. Hikers should plan to hike before 10 am and after 4 pm, resting near shade and water to avoid the worst heat of the day. The National Park Service advises that anyone hiking in heat replace fluids and electrolytes frequently, do not wait until thirsty to start replacing fluids, drink small amounts often and alternate between water and a sports drink with electrolytes. It is also important to balance food intake with fluid consumption. Additional information about hiking smart in the heat is available at https://www.nps.gov/grca/planyourvisit/hike-smart.htm. Hiking in extreme heat can lead to serious health risks including;heat exhaustion, heatstroke, hyponatremia, and hyperthermia.

Indian Garden weather forecast http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat=36.07886551800044&lon=-112.1207174649997

Phantom Ranch weather forecast http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?site=fgz&smap=1&textField1=36.1050&textField2=-112.0940

For more weather forecasts visit the National Weather Service’s website http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fgz/

Road Conditions for Remote Trailheads – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Some roads and trails on the North Rim are closed due to the Fuller Fire. See the "Fuller Fire Trail Closures" update.

After heavy summer rain (July and August) or winter snow (December through March), expect impassable backcountry roads. If clear skies abound after the rain or snow, then it is often just a matter of days until the sun dries everything out. Sometimes, heavy rain or melting snow can lead to flooding, which can cause erosion of the roadbed and can delay access. Snow accumulations have been very low in 2013/2014, so lower elevation dirt roads may be accessible.

Other considerations for visitors travelling on remote backcountry roads include high clearance, such as may be needed on Forest Road 328 to South Bass Trailhead (limestone ledges) and on the final approach to Toroweap overlook (sandstone knobs and ledges).

Finally, consider elevation of the road that you will be travelling on, especially during the winter months. Roads in the 6,500 to 8,000 foot range may be impassable due to a snowpack, where lower elevations roads (below 6,000 feet) will see deteriorated road conditions due to rain.

Always check road conditions with the Backcountry Information Center before heading out to remote trailheads, tell someone where you are going and when you will be back, and be adaptable and prepared for the worst. High clearance, four-wheel drive is usually recommended for roads to remote trailheads.

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It is not uncommon for trees to fall and block access to remote trailheads. When you encounter a road blocked by fallen trees, what should you do?

  • Report the location and diameter of the tree to Grand Canyon park dispatch (928-638-7805) as soon as possible. The park will assign staff to clear the road.
  • If an appropriate (not blocking the road and not damaging vegetation) place to park is available, park your vehicle and continue to the trailhead on foot.
  • Do not drive off-road attempting to bypass the obstacle, doing so can cause resource damage.

Trails Update – date posted Jul 14, 2016

Posted at July 14th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Some roads and trails on the North Rim are closed due to the Fuller Fire. See the "Fuller Fire Trail Closures" update.

Check in with the Backcountry Information Center for the latest trail conditions prior to starting your hike. For information about vehicle access to remote trailheads, contact the Backcountry Information Center.

Hiking the Corridor? Be sure to visit the Trail Courtesy Practices That Leave No Trace webpage.

Hikers without a permit can stop by the Backcountry Information Center to request a last minute permit. Last minute permits and waitlist numbers are issued by the Backcountry Information Center, located inside the park. The South Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily, year round, for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time. The North Rim Backcountry Information Center is open daily from mid-May to October 31 for walk-in visitors from 8 am to noon and 1-5 pm Mountain Standard Time.

Organized Group Rim-to-Rim and Extended Day Hike/Run: Any organized, noncommercial, group conducting rim-to-rim and extended day hiking and running, including rim-to-river-to-rim, and rim-to-rim-to-rim in the inner canyon is required to obtain a Special Use Permit from Grand Canyon National Park. The inner canyon is defined as the area below the Tonto Platform (Tipoff and Indian Garden) from the South Rim and below Manzanita Resthouse (Pumphouse Residence) from the North Rim. Any group, regardless of size, which has advertised to the general public, required individuals to sign up prior to participation, or that has an organizer who has been compensated for their services (including subsidized participation in the activity), is required to operate under a Special Use Permit. For more information visit www.nps.gov/grca/parkmgmt/sup.htm

Zion National Park BioBlitz – Where Dragonflies meet Citizen Scientists

Posted at July 9th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Dragonflies can teach us about ourselves https://www.nps.gov/zion/learn/news/zion-national-park-bioblitz-where-dragonflies-meet-citizen-scientists.htm

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Jun 28, 2016

Posted at June 28th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
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Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water is on or off (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water ON
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water ON
  • Manzanita / Pumphouse Rest Area: water ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water ON
  • Bright Angel Campground: water ON
  • Plateau Point: water ON
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Jun 27, 2016

Posted at June 27th, 2016
Posted by Zion National Park Motel
Categories: Park Details
No Comments »

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, while the pipeline is being repaired water may or may not be available below the rim in the cross-canyon Corridor. Please remember, when hiking below the rim a method to treat water must always be part of your hiking gear.

The list below shows if water is on or off (if the pipeline is undergoing repairs water may be off temporarily)

  • North Kaibab Trailhead: water ON
  • Supai Tunnel: water ON
  • Roaring Springs Day Use Area: water ON
  • Manzanita / Pumphouse Rest Area: water ON
  • Cottonwood Campground: water ON
  • Bright Angel Campground:water ON
  • Plateau Point: water OFF
  • Indian Garden: ON year-round
  • Bright Angel Trail, Three-Mile Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trail, Mile-and-a-Half Resthouse: water ON
  • Bright Angel Trailhead: ON year-round
  • South Kaibab Trailhead: ON year-round

Seasonal water stations are usually turned off for the winter sometime between Oct 10th and 30th dependent on location and associated temperatures.

Water available (year-round) on the South Rim at the Backcountry Information Center in the lobby. Water available (year-round) on the North Rim outside the Backcountry Information Center. Additional water bottle filling stations can be found on the Go “Green” and Refill Your Water Bottles web page.

Plan Ahead and Prepare: A backup method to treat water, should the pipeline break, must always be included as part of your hiking gear. Backcountry hikers should always carry extra water.