Road Conditions for Remote Trailheads – date posted May 15, 2017

After heavy summer rain (July and August) or winter snow (December through March), expect impassable backcountry roads. If clear skies abound after the rain or snow, then it is often just a matter of days until the sun dries everything out. Sometimes, heavy rain or melting snow can lead to flooding, which can cause erosion of the roadbed and can …

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted May 15, 2017

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, …

Angel’s Landing: A Truly Unique Hiking Experience

There are many places throughout Zion to have an enjoyable hike. Some are leisurely, some are strenuous, but none are as exciting as Angel’s Landing. This hike is not for the faint of heart and takes a lot of courage to finish the whole route. The steep hills and quick ascent make it very physically demanding. These challenges are well …

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Apr 27, 2017

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, …

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Apr 26, 2017

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, …

Report from the North Rim – date posted Apr 25, 2017

The North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park will open as scheduled, on May 15, with limited visitor services and water conservation measures due to a break in the North Rim water pipeline. This damaged water line does not affect South Rim or Phantom Ranch operations. The North Rim Campground managed by the National Park Service will operate as scheduled …

Drinking Water in the Cross-Canyon Corridor – date posted Apr 25, 2017

Grand Canyon’s water supply comes from Roaring Springs, a natural spring located approximately 3,500 feet below the North Rim. Water is delivered via an aging pipeline that suffers multiple breaks a year. When the pipeline breaks, water stops flowing to the North and South Rims and sites along the way. Although large storage tanks provide ample water to rim locations, …